Friday, January 10, 2020

Lists and Confessions (and Shopping Bags in the Closet. . . .

Having published my list of Books I Read in 2019 over on my Reading Blog earlier this week, I've also managed to put together  the list I made after Sue (High Heels in the Wilderness) "fessed up" to her wardrobe purchases for 2019 and weighed them against the necessary push (she explains the necessity, citing credible research) toward Slow Fashion. 

I'm nowhere near as organized as Sue, and I don't keep a record of purchases as I make them through the year. Perhaps this needs to change. . . But for now, I made a list by brainstorming, and then double-checked by going through drawers and closets.

Last year, as far as I could remember when brainstorming, I bought,

-- Mango cashmere sweater -- bought in Bordeaux in an independent boutique. The colour is not one I'd normally wear, but the extended cool weather was straining my Carry-On-Only Capsule Wardrobe; I was chilly too often, so my husband bought this for my birthday.  Not a considered choice, but I like the sweater and wear it regularly, more in transitional weather (it's very light) . .  This former prof would rate this a B. Maybe a B- if I were penalizing random buys. . . .

--Brown plaid skirt: Shopping January sales with my visiting ex-pat daughter in a local boutique. Synthetic fabric, but this one just nestled right into the rotation and has been worn 10 or 15 days, at the very least, this year.  Grade: A, except for synthetic fabric and the reality that I didn't strictly need another skirt. In its ethical favour: local shopping. . .

-- Navy Uniqlo skirt, A+ for finding the skirt I'd envisioned for years, natural fibres, pockets, easy, flattering, funky fit. . . Although. . .  chain store (in Bordeaux) and I'm not so sure about Uniqlo's overall ethics. . . However,  worn often already and will be for years

--Pink Uniqlo hoodie -- also bought in Bordeaux under influence of extended cool weather.  I haven't owned a hoodie in decades (not convinced of cotton's warmth), but determined to give this a good try

-- T-shirt (white, hokkaido blue-and-white graphic), also bought in Uniqlo Bordeaux. Not a good shape for me and I knew that when I bought it but loved the graphic. Almost immediately demoted to pyjama top. A lesson in why Uniqlo shop must be done with a list, strictly adhered to. Or just stay outside.

-- oversized boyfriend jacket (herringbone printed pattern in a cotton-synthetic blend) Inès de la Fressange collaboration with Uniqlo. On sale, but only Large left, which I told myself worked with the style for layering underneath. Illustrates why sale-shopping is dangerous. This purchase embarrasses me and perhaps should stay in my closet as a reminder. . . But someone will find it useful, so I'll send it to the thrift shop, without kidding myself that I'm absolved. . . More penance is required (Yes,  learned my Catholic catechism well, confessed regularly for enough years to know the drill)

--black felted-wool Eileen Fisher skirt. No regrets. Pockets, slim fit, classic but with a bit of 90s street funk (hey, it's all subjective, right, and that's how it makes me feel, especially worn with my Blundstones)

--"Spruce" coloured EF merino sweater. same shape (swingy, boxy, with divided hem, longer back) as the navy one I bought last year. Wanted another because first gets worn so often and I'd like both to last. Not perfect as the merino is blended with a synthetic which makes the fabric more prone to wear (although also pretty delicious in the first months for feel, performance)

--Raincoat M0851. No regrets at all. I've needed to check this box for a few years now, have been making do with cheaper coats that compromise in various ways. This has a capacious hood, is slim-looking yet roomy enough to fit a sweater under, pockets are yummy thick flannel inside, and the (technical/synthetic) material is weather-resistant enough and will age into a patina that looks like fine lambskin. Check. Check. Check.

--Olive linen jumpsuit. Bought at a local boutique, designed and made locally with ethically sourced materials. Love this and it's comfortable to wear (easy on my tummy, but flattering enough).

--Burgundy-white striped T-shirt, bought at same local boutique when I bought the jumpsuit. Didn't need it, but I wear it a lot and like the addition of stripes and burgundy to revive other combos

--M0851 Backpack. I have purses/bags enough that I could have managed, but I bought this because I do so much city walking (often 8 or more kilometres in a day) carrying a bag, and even a cross-body was causing shoulder problems, required shifting and shifting. No regrets about this one at all.

--2 pairs of sneakers, one white with green stripes (Stan Smith Adidas), one black New Balance for wearing with everything and anything all over the city. . . Both purchases I feel good about and my only new shoes last year (unless Georgia remembers another pair -- see below ;-)

--scarf bought in Paris this last visit. Cotton and I loved the colour combo for introducing something new -- I'll show you someday. This was inexpensive and worth the price simply for the delightful conversation I had with the Italian boutique owner in a shop not far from "my" hotel in Saint Germain, all in French, and she even wondered if I was living in Paris now!!! (Okay, maybe she did see me coming, but it felt genuine). Also, she showed me how this scarf's shape will work well to manage a bad hair day or simply to keep it out of my way in the summer.

--Pants
--And top, both in navy floral, pyjama style, and bought for my nephew's wedding in the spring. I definitely could have found something suitable to wear from my closet, but my nephew was in his last weeks and I was so moved by his and his wife's determination to celebrate their love and focus on joy that I wanted to dress especially for the occasion. Both pieces have been worn a number of times since then (they're a bit light for winter months), but even if I'd only worn them for that wedding, I'd have no regrets. . .

--J. Crew, wool Black Watch pants, bought last month and worn five or six times since, and no doubt I'll be wearing these regularly for years. Lined, warm, classic fit,

--Sweat pants, heavy cotton, bought at local boutique, after feeling a need for casual, easy-to-wear panst for over a year. Unfortunately, these are not the pants, and I'm going to be stuck wearing them out. In front of the shop mirror,  I told myself I just wasn't used to the shape and the bulk. But not only do they flatter; as well, the elastic waist is tighter than I want (and no, I'm not opening seams and replacing elastic!)  Close to fail on this one, but I'll wear them. Penance, and all that. . . .

 -- I also knit myself that welted (striped) navy and grey sweater, which is very much an example of Slow Fashion, although I'm quite conscious that Making can also be indulgent and can be tough on the planet. It's not a free pass, but this particular sweater comes close. The knitting was painstaking, so it made me attentive to the process of consumption, and the yarn was ethically sourced.

There you go. I made the list, Brava Me! for "fessing up" like Sue, and I took a photo of it, and I uploaded it to this post. . . . .

NOTE: RETAIL-shaming ahead. . . Yikes!
And then, how embarrassing . . . to have my memory refreshed by a comment Georgia made last post. She thought she'd seen a recent purchase of mine in the same colour as that cardigan. At first, I drew a blank and thought she must have been thinking of a floral-print yellow top I bought two years ago in Paris.  A few hours later, though, I flashed on the Eileen Fisher sundress I'd bought impulsively (because it ticked so many boxes: colour, shape, length, lightness, breathability for summer heat) . . . at the same time I'd (also impulsively, but also justified by the box-ticking) a navy cardigan. . . You can see both in this Instagram photo -- and if you'll wonder how I could have forgotten so quickly a purchase made last spring, I can only say that the dress has been packed in the summer box for months now, and the cardigan won't get worn until coats aren't needed (Its boxy shape means it doesn't fit well under my winter coats, nor does its linen-cashmere blend provide much warmth).

So those two garments bring my numbers up to 19 new garments purchased, plus 2 pairs of shoes, plus a sweater I knit myself.

Except that when looking for evidence of the mustard sundress and navy cardigan, I found under the What I Wore label, a blogpost from last January when I purchased this boldly striped, oversized mohair cardigan, bought after I saw it in the window of the local independent boutique which is dangerously close to my home. I did think about the purchase for several days, but it was a coup de foudre. This one I hadn't forgot. I've been wearing it most days lately around the condo for comfort and cheer. In fact, it's in use often enough that I assumed I'd had it for longer than a year. . .
.
20 garments bought new in 2019.
20 that I can remember, that is. . . .

I know I've reduced significantly in the last three or four years, post-retirement, post-move. I also know that my buying was indulgent for two decades (40s-60s), more measured the decade before that, and frugal (but never truly deprived) until my mid-to-late 30s (I made more of my own clothes than I bought for at least five of those years). I'm thinking about this now, thinking about how I want to go forward. Thinking about how I can still derive pleasure from dressing myself with Style (my own), with some deference to Fashion (not slavish, but I value being, and showing, connection to the current culture -- and let's face it, at our/my age, the opposite can be assumed and can result in the kind of dismissal/invisibility we sometimes lament). This list, though. . . Can I do better in 2020? I'm going to try. . .

All of that for another day. The conversation continues, and now time for you to add your two cents. . .  Mic's open, Comments below. Thank you!

23 comments:

Lisa said...

The Calvinist's approach would not involve penance, rather, your blogpost would be evidence of good rational thinking and the resolve to do a better job and that, in this framework, suffices! ;) Penance does serve a role, though, now that I think about, inasmuch as it reinforces determination with sense memory.

Anyhoo....I bought one pair of jeans, two turtlenecks, a black denim jacket, and two pairs of shoes (due to Achilles tear). I also had a death in the family, and bought a dress and pumps to wear to Mom's memorial service.

That's all I remember. Maybe some UNIQLO sweats and tops to wear in the house while writing? I can't imagine it was actually so little, but, definitely not a lot. I'm motivated by a fixed budget, the need to replace a fence this summer, and a simple lack of places to wear anything particularly exciting!

hostess of the humble bungalow said...

I keep track of all my purchases and the cost of each item. It’s quite a good reminder of how much I spent and I have been doing this since 2013. My wardrobe is very small and for many would be quite boring but it works for me. I use scarves and jewelry to add interest.
Be very careful if you pack that backpack heavy and full ! after my previous two frozen shoulders I was told heavy bags can exacerbate that problem and I suffered for several years with pain.

materfamilias said...

Lisa: There are certainly problems with the Catholic practice of confession and its attendant penance/absolution, although there are arguments for the psychological cleansing involved. The "examination of conscience," is the baby that shouldn't be thrown out with the bathwater, and your Calvinist might approve ;-)
Your year's list would testify to the value of buying fewer pieces of higher quality which will then need replacing far less often. And of course this stage of our lives, which I've almost adjusted to wardrobe-wise -- you seem to have that figured out now.
Hostess: Yes, you seem very organized and you make a curated wardrobe work very well. My backpack is actually a purse, made of a very light leather, and much easier on my neck and shoulders than the cross-body bag I'd switched to. I think my strength-training is helping as well. Watching friends suffer with frozen shoulders has me very motivated to avoid!

Georgia said...

Ha ha! I would like to claim powers of memory such that your entire wardrobe has been catalogued in my mind, but no, it's really just envy. And it was just the colour that stayed with me, not the dress itself, because I can't wear mustard...my colouring is just too icy and pale.

Herringbone printed pattern! I am shocked and somehow delighted by this confession. :)

Taste of France said...

Shopping is a lot like eating. We see something that's JUST THE RIGHT THING, the answer to our dilemmas, and we get it, it becomes part of our wardrobe and we cease thinking about it because it's no longer new. Kind of like being hungry hours after a snack. We look forward to the next thing. It's why being mindful and taking account is useful.
I bought two dresses this summer. One Uniqlo and one from a little boutique in town. Both linen. I love them both. My summer dresses were downright ratty, dating to before my husband lost his job, quite a few years ago already. But since I work from home and get to town only once a week or so, I couldn't justify upgrading. Then a friend told me to please get something new. A little embarrassing, but the push I needed. She helped me pick them out, too.

Sue Burpee said...

Well done! I loved reading this. And your analysis, confession, fessing up... whatever we call it. I do remember that striped cardigan. Love that sweater. Those post New Year purchases always get lost for me too. I tend to thing of spring as being the first purchases for the next year. Only my blog keeps me honest there. And my little book of lists. Sooo many times I've been shopping and have launched myself at a top or a dress, feeling inexplicably drawn to it (ha).... because when I check my little book... I already own something almost the same.
I think that a boutique close to home would be the death knell for my slow fashion efforts. Because I'd stop in often, if only to chat about what is new, and my newly made "friend" would always have something special to show me. Oh, that would be too dangerous. Still. It would be nice to have a "local." Like the Brits and their pubs.
On another note... I too remember those indulgent years when student debt was paid off and I was finally making enough money to indulge. Hmmm. Might be a blog post idea there. Thanks, Frances. xo

Suz from Vancouver said...

Thanks for sharing. I think you did pretty great.
I too kept track of my purchases (inspired by Sue) but my tally was focused on the dollar amount rather than quantity so maybe I will check the number of items too. I fear I will be shocked as the dollar amount was a bit of a jolt. And since many were secondhand, the quantity will probably also give me a scare. Hopefully that will motivate me to be better.
Suz from Vancouver

Jen Lawrence said...

Well done! I bought a bunch of inexpensive pants last year, post endometriosis surgery. They look nice but I don't think the synthetic fabric will wear well. This year, I'm on the hunt for some nice natural fibre pieces that are comfortable.

Susan B said...

I don't usually keep close track because I tend to order a lot of things to try in bursts at the start of seasons, but end up returning most of it. Since my color analysis, I've been much more discriminating about what I've kept. But you've inspired me to keep track going forward!

Carolpres said...

Oh, boy, I'd be hard-pressed to actually list what I bought this year, although I know it wasn't too bad, compared to some years past. I do know I can blame Sue for my Liverpool jeans that I bought in November - she waxes so enthusiastically about them that I had to buy them, and I think their cost-per-wear (my personal gauge for how a purchase works) must be pennies already!

I think I'll write down my purchases this year - it will be interesting, with the moving-to-Portugal wardrobe purge combines with the -what-I-want-to-wear-in-retirement-besides-workout-clothes dilemma, plus the uncertain element of will I be able to find clothes that fit my, er, larger frame in Portugal, or do I need to stock up ahead?

Linda B said...

A good idea to keep a list with wee hearts and crosses against the items - helpful in terms of deciding on future purchases if you can see a pattern of crosses?
It's interesting how the periods of indulgence and restraint work out across a period of time in people's lives. My one period of indulgence in clothes came when both children were away at university, and university costs were much, much lower than the private school fees we'd been paying and which saw me deftly assembling a wardrobe of supermarket (supermarket sale, even!) items. Luckily at that time Sainsbury's was producing fantastically sturdy, well made clothes. On retirement from my university job I had a huge clear out of my wardrobe, including the work items which in colour and excitement reflected the fact that I pretty much hated my job. It was so good to see these clothes packed off to the charity shop! Since retirement I've bought a few items in France and Sweden, but very little at home. You've made me dredge my memory for last year's purchases: one pair of flat strappy sandals in gold and silver, half price, made in Italy, in a wee shop in my local market town, and amazingly in my large size 8. Bought to replace a rather frumpy pair of Ecco navy sandals which had been my "France" stalwart, had had the strap repaired once, and which couldn't be repaired further. I wore them once to an evening event, and may not wear them again until we go back to France. One pair of brown leather chelsea boots from Marks and Spencer, because they were a gap in my wardrobe I'd felt for many years, and these were good quality, were comfortable, and under £50. One pair of burgundy and navy tartan slim leg, flat front trousers from Uniqlo, because they were half price and I had longed for a pair. Could have been a mistake. I haven't worn them yet. One floaty long sleeve floral top, also M&S, because I only have one long sleeved, thermal vest possibility underneath, smart-casual top. I do regret buying this last one, and may end up selling it on Ebay. Like Annie, most of our dusters are worn out shirts and T shirts. I would be horrified to have to buy a pack of dusters!

K.Line said...

I love posts like this - very thought-provoking but also including lots of gorgeous garments (what can I say? I'm on both sides of the fence!) I've been thinking a lot about consumption for the last couple of years. Nothing like doing a massive reno (never the most eco of projects) that costs 2x original budget. Also, sitting on one's couch for 10 months requires approximately 3 pairs of lounge pants and 5 t shirts. Ask me how I know.

But I'm an avid knitter (and when the mood strikes, sewist). Those things have a footprint. At least they fall into 2 categories simultaneously: consumption and entertainment. I am committed to going back to spinning (now that hand pain has stabilized) because that takes me a step back and, while consuming occurs, the process of knitting becomes slower, but no less fun. Mind you, spinning cannot scratch the itch of knitting (nature's perfect craft).

I'm bringing my lunch, in part, to make my personal footprint smaller. I rarely give gifts that I haven't made in some way - not that this means I'm spending less, but I can confirm that some of production cycle is fair. When I see holes in my wardrobe I fill them and I don't worry much about buying, because (at least to my gnat-like memory), it's not excessive and I wear those things. I also aim to buy the best things I can for longevity and because I like fine things. But now you've got me thinking about whether I've bought things I just don't remember!

materfamilias said...

Georgia: For the same reason--that colour, which I really love but thought I couldn't wear, turned out to be wearable in the form of that very dress. So I should have remembered it. Ah, well. As for that jacket. I went to my closet and looked at it and it's better than I remembered -- the herringbone is actually found within the boxes of an overall Glen plaid -- and the plaid isn't printed but woven into the cotton forming a cotton twill. And the shell is 100% cotton, the lining (just for shoulders/upper back) polyester. And looking more objectively (pushing my shame aside ;-), I see that it's actually well made, the pockets are welted. . . It's still too big more me, but perhaps I should tuck that hoodie underneath it!
Tof France: I can imagine that working from home in a small village makes a big difference to tamping down that drive to acquire. I know I need far fewer garments than I thought I did when I was "performing" in front of three or four different classes each day. Even retired, though, I've wanted to present an image that appeals to potential new friends here in the city after our move, and since even putting the compost out means coming back through our building's lobby, I'm more attentive to dress than when I lived on our island, population 300.
Sue B: The boutique nearby is dangerous, although it's aimed at a younger, urban buyer, and while they're thoughtful SA's, and friendly, I don't get drawn in the way I did at one I'd pass on my way home to the island from work "in town" -- those women were my age, and fun, and they had new stock always coming in, and even though it could skew to the "ladies who lunch" or the "artsy cousin" (to borrow Lisa's term), I was susceptible. Especially, since they'd often open a bottle of bubbly and hand shoppers a flute in the late afternoon toward the end of the week. . .
Suz from YVR: Thanks! You raise some interesting points that I'd like to come back to in a subsequent post. We all have different measures for assessing our virtue when we shop. Some applaud money saved, some applaud overall restraint, some applaud ethical shopping (whatever those ethics happen to be). . . it gets complicated, doesn't it? And while we judge our efforts, we're generally incorporating voices that stretch back through our decades.

materfamilias said...

Jen L: I think you get a pass when it comes to shopping and dressing pre and post-surgery. (I know some will say we're running out of free passes, planet-wise, but I worry about becoming overly strict and judgemental.)
Susan B: I've seen others (Duchesse of Passage des Perles, with her Dogs and Stars) do this over the years and not been tempted to make my own confession (perhaps because it would have been a much higher number other years). But Sue Burpee's post got me this year -- it's an interesting process and I always think consciousness-raising (mindfulness, the more current term I guess) is worthwhile..
CarolPres: I've got to look at those Liverpool jeans again, although I'm pretty committed to wearing out my current pairs before buying more. I'm so intrigued by this move you're making to Portugal -- if you're at all open to the idea of you and I chatting about it in a future post (the how and where and why)--I'd write up some questions. Email me at fsproutATgmailDOTcom if you'd consider it.

materfamilias said...

Linda: Yes! That's so interesting, the lifetime patterns of indulgence and restraint, budgets and spending, ebbing and waning. Sue Burpee's planning a post on that . . . . And your comment also resonates with what Suz from Vancouver says, and with my response to her. The different values we bring to our shopping -- pride we take, perhaps, in buying sensibly, getting good bargains, or, for some, in finding just the right garment for a particular event, however impractical otherwise. Pride in doing without so our children get the best schooling or we can buy our first home, while others take pride in knowing the put together an impeccable outfit every day. So interesting.

givi said...

This was so interesting to read. I have a new-years resolution this year; to think through what I am buying, and buy what I need and not just because I want something. I am not sure how easy or difficult this will be to keep, but the motivation is high. There are so much good, wearable stuff in my wardrobe. I would probably have trouble remembering everything I bought last year. It happens that things show up and I can't remember when I bought it. Writing down things is a good idea.

Anonymous said...

Brava-so lovely to read your little descriptions!
For me,it is interesting, and even needed, to keep records of my purchases. To analyze,think about....and not only about clothes. There are a lot of other fields where one could make difference,avoid mistakes and decide to choose better...to try to get appliances repaired if possible instead of buying a new one...to investigate beauty brands and choose more natural ones...to think about what our skin or hair needs....
Luckily,we can still buy fresh fruits and vegetables on open markets,not wraped in plastic....
Dottoressa

sylvie renvoizé said...

Hi! well done Frances I admire the way you are able to keep track of your last year purchases ! and I enjoyed my reading which is very useful , so much vocabulary and new words for me !! Have you heard of this new method to be better consummer and (eventually) be happier? It' s called BISOU (small kiss in 🇫🇷)
B stands for Besoin (do I need this?)
I for Immediat (do I need it NOW?)
S is for Semblable ( haven't I already got something similar?)
O for Origine (where has it been manufactured, in which conditions?)
U for Utile ( is it really useful? impacts on my everyday life?

This consummer behaviour should be mine in 2020 ! Well easier to stick to it when you are retired, you've got nough bits and pieces in your cupboards and wardrobes. Priorities are different when you' re over 65 !! Well my bank account should appreciate too...

So big Bisou 😘 from France, have a nice and cosy Sunday
ps : sorry for all the mistakes ...

materfamilias said...

K: Awareness, self-reflexiveness, honesty, and balance -- I read all of this in your thoughtful comment. It's important to keep an eye on what feeds us as well, what keeps us healthy, brings joy. With clear awareness of its cost. Working on it. . . Nice to have company ;-)
Givi: I think that it's okay to feed our Wants sometimes, as well as our Needs, but sometimes we get them confused and I think that can lead to much unhappiness. We keep buying, hoping that will meet a Need, but the Need is not necessarily for something material. You're really wise to take time to question what the need really is.
Dottoressa: Yes! It goes far beyond clothes. Our car is almost 20 years old but still meets our needs very well. Appliances -- even if the part/repair costs more than replacement, still worth it for environmental reasons. Repairing, making do, doing without. We need to keep those habits, if we have them, or get them back, if we've lost them, or learn them, if they're new to us. You learned yours the hard way and they stuck. Brava!
Sylvie: Thanks so much for the Bisou! Clever and a very good check. You're right -- much easier to stick to in retirement when priorities shift and the closets and cupboards are full. Hope you had a pleasant Sunday. And p.s. Your English is very good! No apologies necessary! xo

Eleonore said...

I already mentioned in my last comment that I bought almost no clothes last year. I cannot take credit for any particular moral strength - I simply do not enjoy shopping (clothes). I also said that I feel quite different when it comes to yarn shops, for example. And you are very right to point out that the same criteria we have for clothes (Sylvie's "BISOU") apply to yarns and hand knit items as well. So I can see some very hard decisions in my future. At the moment I am spared, though, because I am still busy stash-busting.
I also totally agree with Dottoressa that all this should apply not only to clothes but to other things as well (I have to get my espresso machine repaired). Your "repairing, making do, doing without" sums it all up perfectly.
It was fascinating to read all these comments and get to know many different approaches to something which, obviously, is relevant to all of us one way or another. Thank you for creating and maintaining this community.

Smithposts... said...

So glad to read (via Instagram) that you have returned to your drawing and sketching. You have put in so much effort over the past few years and I am sure a review of your sketches, much the same as a review of books or clothing, will reflect how far you have come. I enjoy the snippets of journal you periodically share. They always inspire me on my own art journey.

As far as clothing accountability goes, well, I just have a long way to go. Always a disorganized and impulsive area of my life. Would have hoped that by now, in my retired, senior citizen status (that always makes me grin) that I would be adulting with clothes by now. Anyway, I have a goal of at least organization by 2021 so here's to a productive 2020 getting me there.

Duchesse said...

Yay, found this post after your comment to me. It initially struck me as a lot of items but, what with special occasions and the travel, I changed my mind. (Travel does that to a woman! Also it is so much fun to shop with a daughter, lucky you.)Chuckled at your 'confessions'. There is a whole other post about working in someone's gift to you, that you would not pick out for yourself. (I find mango drains me, what with my grey hair and colouring, but I love, love the colour. And as another small-condo dweller, I'm completely with you re donating the meh items rather than shoving them further back in closet.

As for conscious consumption, I have pledged to completely forego fast fashion, as the stats continue to roll in, and whenever possible to support local designers (who do sometimes manufacture offshore). And like so many oters I so enjoy seeing your drawings!

materfamilias said...

Smithposts: Thanks for the sketching encouragement. As for the closet accounting, I found that it took me awhile to figure out my retirement needs and also that my mood during the transition may have governed some shopping. I just keep trying. . . ;-)
Duchesse: I think there are a lot of items, although apparently about 1/3 of the average consumer's (I find this very hard to accept, really, and wonder how this calculation is made. Rather than travel and shopping with a daughter, I think much of what has influenced me over the past few years is adjusting to my retirement lifestyle and to living in the city. . . . and the emotional ups and downs of those adjustments. The relationship between emotions and shopping has been well exploited by retailers, of course, and the consumer triggers planted way, way back. I continue to work toward overcoming these but it's definitely a work in progress.

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