Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Balenciaga Noir at the Paris Bourdelle . . . Continued

 As promised in that teaser of a "postcard" I sent you earlier from our visit to the sumptuous Balenciaga exhibition in Paris' Musée Bourdelle, here (finally) are more images for you. I apologise for the combined limitations of my photographic skills, the iphone camera (which is pretty good overall, for what it is), the black garments, the museum lighting, and the reflective surfaces of the glass cases and windows. Still, I think you might enjoy having a wander through the show with me. . .
And I've decided I won't distract you with much accompanying chatter today.
It's another busy week here (an out-of-town friend visited yesterday; Pater and had a long bike ride on Monday, have some kayaking planned for later today and a canoe outing tomorrow!), and besides, I don't think my words are any match for Balenciaga's brilliance.
Speaking of brilliance. . . .
See below, the text I've photographed which explains a bit about the Spanish designer's heritage and the way that influenced his use of black, the way he played with the differences between its matte and its sheen qualities in different fabrics and materials.



I've also included a few photos that try to give you a sense of how marvellous it is to see couture displayed against sculpture, to see it exhibited as another form of art. (You might want to look back at my posts on the Mme. Grès couture exhibit in this same Musée Bourdelle a few years ago (here, here, and here) or at my posts on the Azzedine Alaia exhibition at Rome's Borghese Gallery (a second post here -- wow! my hair was short there/then!). The interplay between sculpture and couture makes me wish for more shows like this.



But that's all I'm going to say for now. Feel free to ask any questions about the exhibit, although I'm not sure I'll be able to answer -- I did pick up the (smaller, less weighty) catalogue of the exhibition, so I have more information here for the digging. . . .

Isn't this back sublime? If only I could walk away so elegantly. . . .
Elegant or not, here I go, though. Hope you've enjoyed this little tour -- I have photos enough for at least one more post, and the next one will feature Balenciaga's sketches, which were really a treat to see.
Now, over to you. Comments, please. . . .

14 comments:

  1. All I can think is, "I'd wear any and all of those dresses in a heartbeat!"

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    1. And you'd look stunning in any of them!

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  2. I agree with Lisa-amazing!
    Dottoressa

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  3. Some of the longer dresses remind me of old Spanish state robes. Straight out of a Velázquez painting.

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    1. Yes! I think his heritage is clear....

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  4. Yes, there are a couple that I would quite happily strut around in. The only problem is no where to strut around here.
    Ali

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    1. They have no imaginable place in my lifestyle except for me to admire them at a distance, in a museum. . . ;-)

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  5. Glorious. Just my kind of clothing. Wish I could have seen the exhibition. Thank you for sharing.

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  6. Not that I need justification for buying more black clothing (though certainly not at this level), but these are just exquisite.

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    1. Exquisitely out of my pocketbook and lifestyle, but yes, yes they are!

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  7. Your photos are better than mine, it was difficult to capture the details with a phone camera but you have managed to show how the couture pieces were enhanced by their magnificent surroundings. In addition to the Musee Bourdelle and Balenciaga's genius, I was struck by the absence of tourists and the number of Parisians of all ages visiting the exhibition. Also, I had no idea how many different ways black could be described; the shades of light and dark, variety of fabrics and textures, pattern cutting and how all this affects the way black is perceived by the eye. The language on the display boards was poetic. Thanks again for your recommendation! Wilma D

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    1. Good point, Wilma D. It's true, and I must say this is why I love some of the smaller museums/galleries with shows that are focussed enough to draw the attention of locals at least as much as of tourists. I so admire the range of Parisians who attend these exhibitions, often obviously making an outing of it with friends, discussing the show -- generally with considerable discernment and knowledge -- as they walk through it and then afterwards, over lunch. You're right, although I hadn't remembered, that there were almost no (obvious, at least) tourists when we saw this, but a good flow of really engaged viewers who mostly spoke French. Interesting. And I'm so glad you enjoyed it as well.

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I'd love to hear your response to my post. Agree, disagree, even go off on a tangent, I love to know you're out there, readers. Let's chat, shall we? I apologize, though, for the temporary necessity of the Word Verification -- spam comments have been tiresomely numerous lately, and I'm hoping to break that pattern.

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