Wednesday, November 25, 2015

Word-less Wednesday Walk in the Garden. . .

Much as I enjoy writing here, it was a pleasant respite to have Dottoressa at the keyboard for a change -- her post on Coffee in Croatia gave an intriguing glimpse into another country and its culture, and I also enjoyed reading her responses to commenters.

 I'm working on some words at the moment, shifting back and forth between some aspects of my recent travels that I hope you might still be interested in and sorting out the changes that retirement is making to my priorities. Meanwhile, of course, the quotidian domestic is ever with us, luckily, and occasionally I'll want to post on that. Sorting. List-making. Sorting.

 For which a ramble around the garden is always useful.

Should you want more words, I've posted recently on Paris (an art exhibition and a little love story) and my daughter has (finally) posted on the time we spent together in Bordeaux.  I wrote a short post on recent Fiction Therapy I've indulged in, over on my reading blog.

And Annie is never at a loss for words -- they're always entertaining. Duchesse takes on the Iris phenomenon from a fresh perspective. My Bordeaux friend posted a strong riposte to those who would chastise her for being outraged at the attacks in Paris.

But for now, if you'd like, we can just ramble. . .
First, a bit of "borrowed landscape," if I might use a horticultural planning term purloined from much greater ambitions. Modest as this rough copse might be, I've always felt very lucky at having this scrap of "wild" just over the property line, comprised of a beach access easement and a patch of yard our neighbour's left uncultivated.
 Moving back to wander our own garden, I'll point out a few things to you, but generally try to keep quiet and let you look. You might notice the way all the seasons are encompassed in this fall garden: the rhododendron bud above pointing to next spring, while the Mexican Mock Orange (choisya ternata) remembers the summer in its second blooming, while the blackened leaves of the False Indigo (baptisia australis) seems a sure harbinger of winter.
 Fall, though, with its rich palette, is clearly in charge. . .

 even if the green lichen climbing up this old cedar trunk might seem to belie its command.
The Sedum Spectabile (Autumn joy) holds onto a last flush of colour
 and the ornamental maple leaves dangle decoratively from bright limbs...

 Every November, I smile in self-congratulation that over a decade ago I planted numerous winter-flowering fragrant plants. This Viburnum bodnatense (Pink Dawn) is an absolute act of grace on a grey February morning, but already against a clear, cold November sky it's got my adoration.
 Tall grasses should be in everyone's garden if they're at all adaptable to your climate -- not just for the foliage and the great speared inflorescences, the rich golden and bronze tones in the fall, but also for the movement these grasses add to a garden with any breeze.
 And rose hips!

And hawthorn berries -- I've had so much pleasure watching a variety of birds bobbing on the hawthorn branches, tugging these bright berries for what I suppose is a sumptuous meal. They've left enough, though, for gleaming in the sharp fall afternoon sunshine. . .
 And cotoneaster . . .
 And hawthorne berries again . . .
























As always, comments welcome. I do hope you enjoyed this late fall stroll through a garden that's getting ready for winter. Stay warm!

17 comments:

  1. The fall palette,rich,beautiful and peaceful,so is your garden! Even the beautiful flowers (congrats :-)) seem quiet in their bloom,no need for competition,they just are here!
    Dottoressa

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    1. It's such a lovely time in the garden, retrospective, winding down, but also evaluating, thinking to next year...

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  2. A lovely visual journey as I sip my morning coffee. The sun has risen on another crisp and cool morning. Look forward to your comments on how you are adjusting to retirement. It is quite different than our working life!

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  3. I enjoyed that stroll and natter very much. It even shut me up for a bit. Over here in northern England we seem to be colder than you at present since there is very little left on tree or bush. Mind you, we had unseasonable warmth about three weeks ago and my bamboo was delighted! That has all changed. I visited Vancouver Island over 30 years ago with a friend whose parents lived there. It was beautiful and autumn was just beginning to make itself felt. I have yearned to return since. I really liked Canada - best bits of Britain and America with the volume down nicely. It was also the first time I ever had lime in a G&T.

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    1. Despite the blooms that suggest warmer temps, these photos were all taken on days when the Mercury hovered around zero....
      What a great association with Canada, the civilizing effect of lime on a G&T!

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  4. Absolutely beautiful! Wonderful photographs, capturing the real beauty of a garden dying down, surging here and there, decaying. Thank you.

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    1. You're very welcome, and thank you! Surprising how beautiful decay can be.

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  5. You are making good use of your camera these days. Beautiful foliage and color.

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    1. Thanks, Lorrie. Means a lot coming from you, who wields a camera to delightful effect!

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  6. What a beautiful part of the world to wake up to each day! Thank you for sharing your views .... The colours are stunning. Like Leslie, I've enjoyed reading this with my morning cup of coffee :)
    Hope you're having a good week
    Rosie

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    1. I'm having a very good week, thanks Rosie, and so pleased you enjoy the photos.

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  7. Beautiful photos! Blog reading with my favourite cup (a gift from a special former student) of coffee is my preferred early morning activity.

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    1. How nice, your morning coffee reminding you daily of the best of your teaching while you enjoy the freedom of retirement to wander the blog world. Aren't we lucky?!

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  8. I love the last photo! The details of the shining berries in the foreground, the tree trunks which give the feeling of protection, and behind them the view of the wide blue sea... Incredibly beautiful!

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    1. Thanks so much, Eleonore, that's my favourite as well.

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  9. Your garden is like a forest! So lively and natural.

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I'd love to hear your response to my post. Agree, disagree, even go off on a tangent, I love to know you're out there, readers. Let's chat, shall we? I apologize, though, for the temporary necessity of the Word Verification -- spam comments have been tiresomely numerous lately, and I'm hoping to break that pattern.

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