Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Doors of Peschici

You'll have noticed that I'm trying to bring my blog back home, so that some of last week's Five Things Friday were pictures of how the garden is doing after its month of neglect, and of a throw I finally finished knitting. And I posted on Monday about a twilight date with Pater riding through Vancouver on our new bikes. But I still have so many photos to share, thoughts to organize, and tales to tell about our month. My plan is to continue to intersperse these travel posts with posts that write (from) home. Hope that suits. . . .

Throughout the Centro Storico (the old city, the historic centre), in which we were staying, marvelous old, heavy doors guarded the entrances to the whitewashed stone houses of Peschici. Once again, imagine a very patient Pater waiting just down the narrow cobbled road, while I wield my camera. . . .
 What you can see most clearly in the blue door of the collage (top of the page) is that many of the doors in Peschici feature a tripartite organization, so that the inhabitants could, presumably, check out their visitor without having to open right up. Or simply receive a delivery without letting in too much heat or cold or rain. Clever.
 Yes, some of my offspring react oddly to the camera. Thank you, son. . .


 This ancient, simple efficiency testifies to a lifestyle,  speaks volumes, the tree from which its wood was once hewn still so visible, the roughness of the tools equally obvious. Someone has gifted it with a coat of red paint once, long ago, but now it bears only a fleeting memory of that brush. . . I find it very moving, somehow.
 And this . . .

 And this


















Back at home, after one too many raccoon explored its possible way over our threshhold, the door left open in the summer heat, Pater is on the hunt for screen doors. Meanwhile, my daughter's clever partner made one himself, knocking together a simple, efficient, and decent-looking model in a few hours. That simple efficiency and the fact that he used wood for his frame connect that door to these, for me at least. Again, Here and There, Then and Now. . .

Yoga today, a run, some work on my course outlines for Fall term, some knitting (really would like to have a baby blanket finished before Grandchild #3 arrives), reading, just a few items on today's list. What are you up to? Thought about doors lately? Or weaving travel memories into everyday life? Or any comment at all that lets me know you're out there.  . . .I do enjoy our conversations, and I thank you for reading.

24 comments:

  1. Those doors are beautiful! And I'm into the doors. That's one of my fave things to photograph and admire in Europe. One of the things I love most about my own home is the original door.

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    1. Yours is still the original? And it's a home with some history/experience, isn't it? Lucky!

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  2. If they could speak, the doors could tell so many stories. I love to wander and wonder about the inhabitants, past and present.Screen doors are on our list to purchase as well. Warm weather seems to mean buzzing visitors. We removed the beginning of a wasp's nest from behind our bedroom valance. That could have been ugly! You definitely have me considering Italy as a holiday add-on to Paris time. Bonne journée.

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    1. We're keeping an eye on a few small wasps' nests here -- in the wrong spot, they definitely have to move! I'm more bugged (ha!) by mosquitos, which generally don't pest-er (again, ha!) Paul. But he draws the line at raccoons, apparently . . . ;-)

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  3. We went for a walk in a lake front neighborhood of small old houses in Burlington Vermont, and the entrances and screen doors were so individual and interesting, wonderful colors, curlicues, so different from these much older ones but with the same sense of having their own stories and secrets.

    Enjoying your re-entry posts....

    Ceci

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    1. That sounds like a lovely walk in a charming neighbourhood, just the kind I love (I'm imagining trees, lots of trees and lawn). Doors and entrances are such a important part of a home's character, aren't they? (our own are very boring, sadly!). Glad you're enjoying these posts -- thanks for letting me know!

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  4. Hi Mater, I'm dropping in now and again to read, our packers come tomorrow, then the moving van on Friday. We'll be cleaning this weekend (plus a hair appt. for me) and then on Monday moving on to Ottawa. All this to say, there will not be much in the way of comments from me for a little while, but enjoying your photos nonetheless.

    Good luck with the tasks on your list!

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    1. Good luck with the move, and thanks for taking time to comment in the midst of all that. How many moves have we "known" each other through, now? It seems there have been at least 3 since you started commenting. . .

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    2. Hi again Mater - yes, I think this is the third move since then!

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  5. Mater, I cannot seem to send you any comments! Things do not seem to connect. But if you get this...I too enjoy doors when travelling and always take photos. Hot and beautiful here in Yorkshire and now school is finished my fridge is full of gin and chocolate, tributes from parents and children. Summer is icumen in.

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    1. This comment did stick! I've had problems commenting on other spots myself lately, but I'm so glad you persevered.
      Gin and chocolate -- those are some decent teacher gifts -- enjoy!

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  6. Those old doors tell of the years gone by in a more direct fashion than the stone walls which seem to weather time better. Behind the doors lie fascinating stories - one's imagination can go wild.
    Sons are the same everywhere, I see.

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    1. It's true what you say about the doors' more honest testimony about the years. We've noticed the walls being whitewashed, which generally involves repairing the thick layer of plaster (stucco, I guess)before applying the clean-up colour.
      And yes, I believe they are. . . you have one with a similar tendency to clown?

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  7. Those doors are gorgeous. I am thinking about taking off the paint from my front door and see what 1950s era wood lurks below. Thank you for having taken so many pictures, the doors mean more en masse, I think.

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    1. If you play around with your door, experiment with a reveal, etc. I hope you will share on the blog. . . Interesting comment about the doors signifying more clearly together -- I recognize that myself now -- the commonalities become more distinctive this way as well as the efforts to stamp some individuality. I'll have to tell Paul that his patience was not for naught. . . ;-)

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    1. Thank you! Glad to see you back here -- it's been a while since you've posted at your place. . .

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  9. I like the way many of the doors are mended at the base by simply adding a horizontal bar of wood. It speaks of a frugal way of life, not discarding that which is no longer perfect.
    Lilibet

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    1. I hadn't noticed that, Lilibet, but you're right, and there's a real beauty in the story that simple mending tells, isn't there? And, of course, it's "eco" before we were marketing everything as "eco"!

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  10. Wonderful images! I also find myself fascinated with doors when we travel. It's interesting to me the difference in orientation...how much focus with these old towns there seems to be on protecting privacy, compared to the "front porch culture" of many architectural styles in the US. (I happen to love a good front porch, so no disparagement there, just an observation.)

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    1. I notice exactly the same thing, especially as I've always been so fond of front porches and the culture that supports and has built up around them."Our" little (rental) house in Bordeaux has a door that opens very starkly right off the sidewalk, as do all the others in the quartier. The inside is orientated to the very private garden. Such a switch from here, and I enjoy the difference in both places.

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  11. Coming home after a long trip can be a bumpy landing and the transition takes a while. So much to do at home, so much to catch up on and so many photos and memories to be processed. After 3 weeks with no internet, I am still catching up with your travels. Italy is next on my list of places to visit, so looking forward to finding out more about your stay.

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    1. Wow! Three weeks offline -- hard to imagine. Perhaps you'll write about that. . . I'd be very interested in your reflections.

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I'd love to hear your response to my post. Agree, disagree, even go off on a tangent, I love to know you're out there, readers. Let's chat, shall we? I apologize, though, for the temporary necessity of the Word Verification -- spam comments have been tiresomely numerous lately, and I'm hoping to break that pattern.

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